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ERP Solution

ERP is the Integrated version of Finance, Purchase, Sales, Inventory with manufacturing as optional and can be extended up to ERPII (CRM, HRM, SCM, Project Management).

ERP software consists of many enterprise software modules that an enterprise would purchase, based on what best meets its specific needs and technical capabilities. Each ERP module is focused on one area of business processes, such as product development or marketing. Some of the more common ERP modules include those for product planning, material purchasing, inventory control, distribution, accounting, marketing, finance and HR.

As the ERP methodology has become more popular, software applications have emerged to help business managers implement ERP in other business activities and may also incorporate modules such as CRM and business intelligence and present them as a single unified package. The basic goal is provide one central repository for all information that is shared by all the various ERP facets in order to smooth the flow of data across the organization.

ERP Vendors Depending on your organization's size and needs there are a number of ERP software vendors to choose from.

1. Large Enterprise ERP (ERP Tier I): The ERP market for large enterprises is dominated by three companies: SAP, Oracle and Microsoft.

2. (Midmarket ERP (ERP Tier II): For the midmarket vendors include Infor, QAD, Lawson, Epicor, Sage and IFS.

3. Small Business ERP (ERP Tier III): Exact Globe, Syspro, NetSuite, Visibility, Consona, CDC Software and Activant Solutions round out the ERP vendors for small businesses.

ERP's best hope for demonstrating value is as a sort of battering ram for improving the way your company takes a customer order and processes it into an invoice and revenue—otherwise known as the order fulfilment process. That is why ERP is often referred to as back-office software. It doesn't handle the up-front selling process (although most ERP vendors have developed CRM software or acquired pure-play CRM providers that can do this); rather, ERP takes a customer order and provides a software road map for automating the different steps along the path to fulfilling it. When a customer service representative enters a customer order into an ERP system, he has all the information necessary to complete the order (the customer's credit rating and order history from the finance module, the company's inventory levels from the warehouse module and the shipping dock's trucking schedule from the logistics module, for example). People in these different departments all see the same information and can update it. When one department finishes with the order it is automatically routed via the ERP system to the next department. To find out where the order is at any point, you need only log in to the ERP system and track it down. With luck, the order process moves like a bolt of lightning through the organization, and customers get their orders faster and with fewer errors than before. ERP can apply that same magic to the other major business processes, such as employee benefits or financial reporting.